Monday, July 9, 2012

WEIGHT LOSS DRUG AND ENERGY DRINKS SIDE EFFECT - PEPSI - COKE - DIET SODA - POP ICED TEA - SIDE EFFECTS


 A daily can of diet fizzy drink 'increases risk of heart attack or stroke'

    Those who drink diet soft drinks daily are '43 per cent more likely' to have heart attacks
    Carbonated drinks can cause long-term liver damage similar to that of chronic alcoholism

Drinking just a single can of diet fizzy drink every day can increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke, research has revealed.

The new findings have suggested that just a couple of daily cans of the supposedly 'healthier' carbonated drinks, such as lemonade or cola, can raise the risk of liver damage, as well as potentially causing diabetes and heart damage.
Diet fizzy drinks are marketed as a healthy option, but in reality their health benefits over full-fat alternatives remain unclear

Diet fizzy drinks are marketed as a healthy option, but in reality their health benefits over full-fat alternatives remain unclear

Researchers from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and Columbia University Medical Center claim those who drink diet soft drinks are 43 per cent more likely to have heart attacks, vascular disease or strokes than those who have none.

Previous analysis of soft drinks has shown that the soft drinks, which have a substantial amount of artificial sweeteners, can cause liver disease similar to that caused by chronic alcoholism.

'Diet' fizzy drinks are marketed as a healthy option in comparison to 'full fat' alternatives as they have fewer calories.

But their genuine health benefits remain unclear, with some research suggesting they trigger people's appetites even more.

The U.S. research team studied the soft drink and diet soft drink consumption of 2,564 study participants over a 10-year period - along with their risk of stroke, heart attack and vascular death.

They found those who drank diet soft drinks every day were 43 per cent more likely to have suffered a 'vascular' or blood vessel event than those who drank none, after allowing for pre-existing vascular conditions such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes and high blood pressure.

Ms Gardener said: 'Our results suggest a potential association between daily diet soft drink consumption and vascular outcomes.

'The mechanisms by which soft drinks may affect vascular events are unclear.'

She added, however, that the mechanisms by which soft drinks may affect 'vascular events' are not clear, and that more research was needed into the subject before significant conclusions could be drawn about the health consequences of soft drink consumption.

Diet soft drinks often contain artificial sweeteners like aspartame, which has been linked to other health problems such as cancer. However to date, heath watchdogs, including the UK's Food Standards Agency, have ruled out any link to ill-health.

The latest study appears in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.



Mediator – Weight Loss Drug – caused 500 deaths in France
Mediator, a weight loss drug, taken by millions of obese French patients, could have caused around 500 deaths, the French Drug and Safety body announced.
Mediator is a drug initially reserved for obese people with diabetes that became a popular appetite suppressor.
Afssaps, the drug safety body, said expert epidemiologists believed Mediator, made by Servier, had been lethal for at least 500 people and had caused 3,500 others to be admitted to hospital since its launch in 1976.


Weight Loss Drug

Apparently, the ban was applied too slowly in France, given repeated warnings of its potentially lethal side effects. Dr Irène Frachon, who wrote a book on Mediator’s dangers and warned Afssaps in February last year, said: “The health authorities were late in withdrawing this drug despite several alerts.”
The same drug was withdrawn in 2005 in Spain and Italy. It is believed that the drug causes dangerous thickening of the heart valves.
Xavier Bertrand, France’s new health minister, advised anyone who had taken the drug – but above all those who took in the past four years – to see a doctor. SEE ALSO

Weight loss drug 'caused death of 500 people'

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Energy Drinks like Red Bull Harmful for Health
Energy Drinks
Energy Drinks
According to a study, reported in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, whose abstract is listed below, suggests that Energy Drinks are taken by the “weakened warriors” and “by those seeking an edge in an endurance event” are harmful to health. These energy drinks contain excess amount of sugar and caffeine and can make the user dehydrated.
Researchers from the University of Texas Medical School, Houston also warned that users who mixed drinks with alcohol also faced increased heart rates and blood pressure and mental problems.
Energy drinks are soft drinks advertised as boosting energy. These drinks usually do not emphasize that the energy is derived from the sugars that the drink contains, but rather through a choice of stimulants, vitamins, and herbal supplements the manufacturer has combined.
Generally, energy drinks include methylxanthines(including caffeine), vitamin B and herbs. Other common ingredients are guarna, acai, and taurine, plus various forms of ginseng, maltodextrin, carbonated water, inositol, carnitine, creatinine, glucuronolactone and gingo biloba. Some contain high levels of sugar, and many brands also offer artificially-sweetened ‘diet’ versions. The central ingredient in most energy drinks is caffiene, the same stimulant found in coffee or tea, often in the form of guarana or yerba mate.

Countries including Norway, Denmark and France have banned Red Bull after one study showed rats that “were fed taurine and exhibited bizarre behaviour, including anxiety and self-mutilation”.

Exercise is making a resurgence in many countries, given its benefits for fitness as well as prevention of obesity. This trend has spawned many supplements that purport to aid performance, muscle growth, and recovery. Initially, sports drinks were developed to provide electrolyte and carbohydrate replacement. Subsequently, energy beverages (EBs) containing stimulants and additives have appeared in most gyms and grocery stores and are being used increasingly by “weekend warriors” and those seeking an edge in an endurance event. Long-term exposure to the various components of EBs may result in significant alterations in the cardiovascular system, and the safety of EBs has not been fully established. For this review, we searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from 1976 through May 2010, using the following keywords: energy beverage, energy drink, power drink, exercise, caffeine, red bull, bitter orange, glucose, ginseng, guarana, and taurine. Evidence regarding the effects of EBs is summarized, and practical recommendations are made to help in answering the patient who asks, “Is it safe for me to drink an energy beverage when I exercise?”
The researchers reviewed medical literature on energy drinks and their ingredients between 1976 and 2010.
They found that the caffeine content of energy drinks ranged from 70 to 200 mg per 16-oz serving. By comparison, an 8-oz cup of coffee could contain between 40 to 150 mg of caffeine.
Dr Higgins, the lead researcher, said that by not publishing ingredients added to the problem.
“Manufacturers can put whatever in them, advertise however and people consume however. Whenever you have a situation like this, you are going to run into problems,” he said.
Non-athletes should drink no more than one a day, never mix them with alcohol, and drink lots of water after exercising.
People with hypertension should never drink them, and people with health conditions such as heart disease should consult their doctors before using the drinks, he said.
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SEE ALSO Energy drink caffeine levels often stray from labels

NEWS FOX Published October 25, 2012

Energy drinks do not always divulge how much caffeine they contain, and when an amount is listed on a label, it is not always accurate, Consumer Reports magazine has found.

According to a study released on Thursday by the magazine, 11 of the 27 top-selling energy drinks in the United States do not specify the amount of caffeine in their beverages.

Of the 16 drinks that did list a specific caffeine amount, five had more caffeine per serving than was listed and the average amount over was more than 20 percent.

The study comes fast on the heels of news that U.S. health regulators are investigating reports of five deaths that may be associated with Monster Beverage Corp's Monster Energy drink.

At the same time Monster, maker of the top-selling energy drink in the United States, is being sued by the family of a 14-year-old girl with a heart condition who died after drinking two Monster Energy drinks in a 24-hour period.

The lawsuit and reports of other deaths could escalate calls from critics including two U.S. senators and the New York attorney general about the safety of the beverages and the way they are marketed.

Caffeine level not required

Aside from companies not wanting to give away their secret recipes, Consumer Reports said there was another reason why some beverage labels do not reveal exact caffeine levels.

"There is no legal or commercial business requirement to do so," a Monster Beverage official told Consumer Reports. "And because our products are completely safe, and the actual numbers are not meaningful to most consumers."

Caffeine levels in the drinks tested ranged from about 6 milligrams per serving for 5-Hour Energy Decaf, made by Living Essentials, to 242 milligrams for 5-Hour Energy Extra Strength, the report found.

The drinks that Consumer Reports found that contained more caffeine than was listed on their labels included Arizona Energy, Clif Shot Turbo Energy Gel and Sambazon Organic Amazon Energy, as well as Dr Pepper Snapple Group Inc's Venom Energy and Nestle Jamba, sold by a partnership of Nestle and Jamba Inc.

One sample of its Archer Farms Energy Drink Juice Infused beverage had about 70 percent less caffeine than advertised, the report found. Archer Farms is the private label of retailer Target Corp.

None of the companies were immediately available to comment.

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Dietary Supplements & Liver Injury
A new study has linked a number of popular dietary supplements to adverse hepatic reactions including acute liver injury and other serious side effects. Significant injuries have been reported following the consumption of Herbalife and Hydroxycut products, green tea, supplements containing usnic acid and high contents of vitamin A, as well as in anabolic steroids and others. The side effects associated with these products vary widely from person to person, ranging from elevated serum liver enzymes to hepatic failure and even death.
Free Dietary Supplement Liver Injury Case Evaluation: If you or a loved one has suffered a serious liver injury after consuming dietary supplement products, you should contact our law firm immediately. You may be entitled to compensation by filing a lawsuit and we can help.

What’s the problem?

Over the past decade, the use of dietary supplements (DS) has become a major health trend in the United States and other affluent nations. Between 1999 and 2004, consumption of dietary supplements in the US doubled to nearly 20 percent of adults and upwards of 50 percent in certain subgroups such as among elderly, non-smoking females with higher education. This dramatic rise in popularity of dietary supplements can largely be attributed to an increased health conscious awareness and the desire to prevent diseases by optimal nutrition. As a result, the manufacturing and marketing of DS products has become a multibillion dollar business largely unregulated by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA).
In the United States, dietary supplements are expected to meet standards outlined in the Dietary Supplement and Health Education Act, which allows DS distribution without prior approval by the FDA. This controversial licensing practice does not ensure efficacy and safety in the same strict way as with the approval process of conventional drugs. The reckless approval of dietary supplements is made even more troubling by the fact that DS may harbor specific problems because of their complex composition, particularly with respect to quality aspects.
While a number of side effects associated with dietary supplements have been well documented, the issues at hand are still not clearly understood due to widespread and uncontrolled use, as well as by the under-reporting of side effects. Making matters worse, a low public awareness regarding the risk of DS products impedes their recognition as the causative agent in incidents of hepatoxicity. Consequently, statistics involving dietary supplement side effects are likely inaccurate and too low.

Dietary Supplement Liver Injury Case Study

A recent article published in the Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of the Liver has reviewed the current medical literature on liver injuries associated with dietary supplements in order to identify the mechanisms of injury and to increase public awareness of the risks posed by these popular products.
In February 2010, case reports on liver injury occurring following the consumption of dietary supplements published between 1990 and 2010 were searched in PubMed and EMBASE databases and critically reviewed. Products were considered dietary supplements if they were intended to be consumed to improve nutrition, lose weight, or to treat constipation. While hepatoxicity from DS has been addressed in previous case studies, there were few if any summaries devoted specifically to liver-related risks. The new article, which is titled ‘Review of liver injury associated with dietary supplements,’ reviewed a panel of best-selling dietary supplements that have been associated with acute liver injury.

Herbalife Liver Injury Side Effects

Herbalife sells a variety of dietary supplement products for weight control, nutrition, ‘well-being’ and cosmetics. In 2006, it was reported that the company generated $3.1 billion in profits via online marketing and independently operating sales agents.
Since 2007, there have been six published reports on liver damage following the consumption of Herbalife products. Cumulatively, the reports described 34 cases from five countries – Switzerland, Israel, Spain, Argentina and Iceland. The pattern of injury was mostly hepatocellular, but mixed and cholestatic enzyme patterns were also observed. Severity of side effects ranged from mild to severe hepatic damage, including cirrhosis and acute liver failure requiring liver transplantation.
It still remains unclear what might have caused the liver damage in these cases, as patients took up to 17 different Herbalife products at the same time, making it extremely difficult if not impossible to identify the critical compound(s). Moreover, speculations flew over potentially adultered Herbalife products after two patients demonstrated bacterial contamination as a possible explanation of liver injury. Herbalife has numerous manufacturing facilities worldwide, suggesting that contaminated products either intentionally added during the manufacturing process or accidentally contained in the unrefined raw products could have been responsible for the reports of hepatoxicity.

Green Tea (Camellia Sinensis)

Green tea is among the most popular dietary supplement drinks in the United States today. The first incidence of liver injury associated with green tea was reported in 1999, and since then, a rash of similar cases have been reported to regulatory agencies worldwide. In response, a number of green tea manufacturers have recalled their products from their respective markets.
The US Pharmacopeia performed a systemic review of all cases accessible from PubMed, EMBASE and various pharmacovigilance databases, and found a strong causal relationship between observed liver injuries and green tea consumption. The mode of toxicity derived from green tea still remains incompletely understood, but experimental studies have demonstrated both hepatoprotective as well as hepatotoxic properties.
‘Whether the risks from green tea consumption outweigh their benefits remains open, but current evidence as outlined above suggests a causal relationship between intake of green tea containing products and hepatoxicity.’

Hydroxycut Liver Injuries

Hydroxycut is designed to support weight loss, and is sold in powder, capsule, and tablet formulations. Several Hydroxycut drugs have recently been recalled by Lovate Health Sciences following a May 2009 warning issued by the FDA citing 23 reports of severe liver injury associated with the products. Lovate has been charged previously with several lawsuits for unfounded health claims.
Before 2009, Hydroxycut’s main ingredients included Garcinia cambogia, Gymnema sylvestre, chromium polynicotinate, caffeine and green tea. Published cases were recently reviewed and showed acute onset of liver injuries after several weeks of Hydroxycut intake.
Although its exact frequency remains unclear, hepatic injury secondary to consumption of dietary supplements like Herbalife, green tea and Hydroxycut is recognized. Apart from enhanced diagnostic measures, better regulatory steps to assure efficacy are required. Efforts of pharmacovigilance authorities and healthcare providers must act jointly to minimize risks and protect the public. Perhaps most importantly, consumers should develop a more critical attitude toward the expectations and hopes associated with dietary supplement use, and turn to measures for which safety data are known and efficacy is proven.

Do You Have a Dietary Supplement Liver Injury Lawsuit?

The Product Liability & Defective Drug Litigation Group at our law firm is an experienced team of trial lawyers that focus on the representation of plaintiffs in dietary supplement liver injury lawsuits. We are handling individual litigation nationwide and currently accepting new dietary supplement liver injury cases in all 50 states.

Related Content on our Website

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KINDLY VISIT

ENERGY SUPPLEMENT ADVICE FOR A HEALTHY LIFE 




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Are Energy Drinks Like Red Bull Good For You?    Posted by on November 10, 2012



We live in a world where it isn’t unusual to be running on just a few hours of sleep. This is because there are many demands put upon our daily lives. For example, you may have to work a 12-hour shift at work, spend another few hours in class and then come home to a screaming baby that won’t go to sleep. In that case, an energy drink may provide a much needed boost. However, is it safe for you?
The Key Is Always Moderation
Drinking a single energy drink is not going to hurt you. In fact, if you drink them in moderation, it isn’t much worse than drinking a daily cup of coffee. In both cases, you are getting an increased dose of caffeine that will help wake you up and get you going for the day.
However, you should try not to drink more than one or two a day at the very most. There is a lot of sugar and other chemicals that are put in the drinks to give you that energy boost. A single 12 ounce can of a typical energy drink has more sugar and caffeine than even the sugariest soda.
Drinking too many energy drinks can leave you jittery, hyperactive, and unable to sleep at night. Once the drink wears off, you are going to feel more lethargic than you did before. This means that you will have no choice but to grab another energy drink.
Never Mix Energy Drinks With Alcohol
In recent years, it has become popular to mix energy drinks with alcohol. While this creates the impression that you are more awake and less drunk, the truth is that it is just masking the impact of the drinks that you are consuming. Drinks such as Four Loko that were sold with alcohol in them have been banned in some states.
There is no way to lessen the impact that an alcoholic drink has on your body. Once it is in your system, the only way it leaves is by giving it time. Mixing a Red Bull with your drink is not going to help you drive home. In fact, it can actually make things worse for you.
If you don’t think that you are as drunk as you are, you will be tempted to drink even more. This can lead to alcohol poisoning and other negative consequences that are associated with excessive drinking. You could get into a car crash, say something you regret, or do something even worse.
Avoid Energy Drinks If You Have Heart Issues
When you drink something with sugar in it, your body gets a bolt of adrenaline. You are jolted awake and your nervous system starts working harder. This will ultimately put more stress on your heart to keep pumping blood to your body.
Most healthy people can handle pretty large doses of caffeine in their systems. However, doctors warn that those with health problems can see negative health effects from drinking too many energy drinks. In a worst case scenario, you could even die from drinking a single energy drink.
Again, healthy people will not die from consuming an energy drink. But, if you have any health issues at all, consult your doctor before drinking any sort of energy drink. You could be putting yourself in a world of danger that you don’t even know about.
Teenagers Should Stay Away From These Drinks
Teenagers should be highly discouraged from drinking energy drinks. The biggest reason is that teenagers need more sleep than other age groups. Energy drinks are a great way to lose sleep at night. This means that an average teenager could be grouchy, irritable and unable to perform well in school.
There may also be concentration issues during class. It is hard to sit still during a movie or lecture when you are shaking because you have ingested so much sugar. This can lead to discipline issues that could lead to other consequences in the future.
Teenagers are still developing physically. They don’t have mature immune systems and other body structures that can handle the extra sugar. While an adult can handle several energy drinks in a day, a teenager may not be able to. Parents should monitor what their children are drinking on a daily basis to make sure that they are safe. It should be noted that childhood obesity is caused partially by ingesting too much sugar.
A healthy adult will certainly be able to drink an energy drink without too many issues. However, teenagers and those with health issues should stay away from them at all costs. Keep in mind that healthy adults will still suffer from issues such as obesity, tooth issues due to the sugar as well as possible hyperactivity. Therefore, these drinks should be consumed in moderation and without any alcohol added. As with anything else, you have to be responsible for what you put in your body.
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 5-Hour Energy Drinks Cited in 13 Deaths
The federal government and the New York Attorney General's office are investigating after the Food and Drug Administration received claims that the drink 5-Hour Energy may have led to 13 deaths and 33 hospitalizations over the past four years.
The popular energy shot – which comes in 2 oz. packages and packs a powerful caffeine punch, equal to two cups of coffee -- led the way in this new and growing energy drink segment over the past eight years. Now government officials are investigating whether the product, made by Michigan-based Living Essentials, does much more.
"If someone is to use multiple cans, now is when we start to see some of the side effects," Dr. Sean Patrick Nord, USC Director of the Section of Toxicology, told ABC News. "You're getting astronomical amounts, 30 to 40 cups of coffee."

The recent FDA filings mark the second time in a month the administration has confirmed it is investigating claims that energy drinks are causing fatal reactions. In October, Monster energy, another popular drink that contains even more caffeine, was allegedly linked to five deaths.
The manufacturers point out that these are just claims, and there is no proven link between the drinks and the deaths.
In a statement overnight, 5-hour Energy said the product is "intended for busy adults." The company says its compact product contains "about as much caffeine as a cup of the leading premium coffee."
During an interview this September, Manoj Bhargava, the founder and CEO of 5-Hour Energy, told ABC News "Nightline" that when used as directed, the caffeine in his product doesn't do any harm.
"It's overblown. When it's in small quantities … It's like this -- water is good, but if you have too much you drown," he said.
Most experts say the fatal dose of caffeine for an adult would be almost impossible to drink – actually 50 to 60 times of what is contained in an energy drink. But critics worry about children with underlying heart problems drinking them, and are warning that energy drinks may be more hazardous than coffee because of the temperature.
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5 Hour Energy Nutritional Facts

Apr 22, 2011 | By Dan Harriman
The energy drink 5-hour Energy has a formula designed to help you stay energized. Through a blend of ingredients, the drink aims to raise your energy and alertness levels without causing any jitters -- a side effect commonly associated with energy drinks. While 5-hour Energy promises to help you get through the day without feeling fatigued, researchers at the Mayo Clinic question the drink's effectiveness and nutritional value, and worry that its ingredients can cause side effects in the liver or kidneys.
Products

Living Essentials, makers of 5-hour Energy, offers seven varieties of the energy drink, including pomegranate, grape, berry, lemon, orange, decaf and extra strength. The drinks are marketed toward a busy, hard-working audience who need extra energy to get through the day without feeling tired or sluggish. Every 5-hour Energy variety comes in a 1.93 fluid ounce bottle that contains four calories and no sugar. The decaf and extra strength varieties have a formula that differs from the original formula.
Ingredients

Ingredients in the original formula products include 30 mg of niacin, 40 mg of vitamin B-6, 400 mcg of folic acid, 500 mcg of vitamin B-12, 18 g of sodium, and an energy blend that contains taurine, glucuronic acid, malic acid, N-Acetyl, L-Tyrosine, L-Phenylalanine, caffeine and citicoline. The daily value percentages for the B vitamins, niacin and folic acid are extremely high, ranging from 100 percent to 2,000 percent, but are not considered to be at a toxic level, a Mayo Clinic expert told CNN. No nutritional values exist for the energy blend in 5-hour energy, but there is approximately as much caffeine in one 5-hour Energy shot as there is one cup of coffee.
Other Ingredients

Other ingredients in one 5-hour Energy shot that do not play a factor in the drink's energizing effects include purified water, natural and artificial flavors, sucralose, potassium sorbate, sodium benzonate and EDTA, or Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, to help keep the product fresh. The decaf variety does not contain any niacin, while the extra strength variety contains 40 mg of niacin
Usage

If you try a 5-hour Energy shot for the first time, drink only half of the bottle to gauge your body's reaction. A potential side effect is a "niacin flush" reaction from the high vitamin B-3 amount. A niacin flush can consist of a hot, prickly feeling on the skin and skin redness. The reaction should last only a few minutes, according to Living Essentials. The 5-hour Energy website warns to not take the energy drink if you are pregnant or nursing, or under the age of 12. You should speak to your doctor before drinking 5-hour Energy if you are taking medication or have a medical condition.
References

    CNN.com; Small Drinks Promise Big Energy, but Experts Say Effects Unclear; Danielle Dellorto; July 2009
    5-hour Energy: How to Use 5-Hour Energy Shots
    5-hour Energy: 5-Hour Energy Ingredients & Safety

Article reviewed by GlennK Last updated on: Apr 22, 2011

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More Deaths, Illness Linked to Energy Drinks

By WebMD Health News Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD
Nov. 16, 2012 -- The FDA has posted adverse-event reports for two more energy drinks: 40 illnesses and five deaths linked to Monster Energy, and 13 illnesses and two lasting disabilities linked to Rockstar Energy.
The new reports follow this week's revelation of FDA reports linking 92 illnesses and 13 deaths to 5-Hour Energy shots. The FDA previously said it was investigating the deaths linked to 

Monster Energy.
These adverse-event reports (AERs) are filed by patients, families, or doctors. They simply warn that the products might have harmed someone -- but they do not prove that the product caused harm. The FDA can remove a product from the market only when investigation shows that the product causes harm when used according to the product label.
"If we find a relationship between consumption of the product and harm, FDA will take appropriate action to reduce or eliminate the risk,"  FDA public information officer Shelly Burgess says.

Moreover, the reports do not offer details on any underlying medical conditions that may have led to product-related illnesses.
The reports, some dating back to 2004, are not a complete inventory of all events that product users may have suffered. Most people, and many doctors, do not know how to file these reports or do not get around to filing them. And even when a product actually causes an illness, a user or doctor may not associate the product with the illness.
The new reports detail the events suffered by users of 5-Hour, Monster, and Rockstar energy drinks. These include:
  • Deaths due to heart attack or suicide linked to 5-Hour Energy
  • A miscarriage linked to 5-Hour Energy
  • Convulsions, life-threatening fear, deafness, and hemorrhage linked to 5-Hour Energy
  • Deaths due to heart attack or loss of consciousness linked to Monster Energy drink
  • Hospitalization due to irregular heartbeat, severe diarrhea, migraine, psychotic disorder, heart attack, and/or vomiting linked to Monster Energy drink
  • Disability from irregular heartbeat or stroke linked to Rockstar Energy drink
  • Hospitalization due to psychotic disorder, increased heart rate, or loss of consciousness linked to Rockstar Energy drink
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All of these reports are collected by the product manufacturers. Because they market their products as nutritional supplements, they are required to submit them to the FDA.
A recent government report documented a sharp spike in the number of people who need emergency medical care after consuming energy drinks.
Living Essentials, the maker of 5-Hour Energy, said in a statement that the company "takes reports of any potential adverse event tied to our products very seriously."
But the company maintains that its products are safe when used as directed. Rockstar and Monster Energy did not respond to interview requests by publication time.

Caffeine Levels in Energy Drinks

Caffeine is the main active ingredient in energy drinks, most of which also contain herbal supplements.
A recent test by Consumer Reports found that:
  • 5-Hour Energy contains 215 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • 5-Hour Energy Extra Strength contains 242 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • Monster Energy contains 92 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • Rockstar Energy Drink, Double Strength contains 80 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • Rockstar Energy Shot contains 229 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
An 8-ounce cup of coffee has about 100 milligrams of caffeine, although that varies according to how the coffee is brewed. For example, Consumer Reports finds that 8 ounces of Starbucks coffee has 165 milligrams of caffeine.
According to Consumer Reports, safe limits of caffeine are up to 400 milligrams per day for healthy adults, 200 milligrams a day for pregnant women, and up to 45 or 85 milligrams per day for children, depending on weight.
High doses of caffeine can result in restlessness, nervousness, insomnia, and tremors. High doses can also trigger seizures and unstable heart rhythm.
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The 5 Hour Energy Scam And The Power Of Self-Deception


“We asked over 3,000 doctors to review 5 Hour Energy, and what they said is amazing.  Over 73% who reviewed 5 Hour Energy said they would recommend a low-calorie energy supplement to their healthy patients who use energy supplements.”
The first time I saw this commercial, I had to double check to see if it was a Saturday Night Live skit.  But alas, it wasn’t.
Yes, they asked “over 3,000 doctors.”  According to the fine print, they actually asked 5,000 in person and only half of them agreed to review the drink, and by review the drink, they clarify that they agreed to read the ingredients and their associated descriptions.  An additional 503 doctors responded to an online survey, but they don’t tell us how many they asked to respond online.
73% of the docs who actually reviewed the stuff recommended a low-calorie energy supplement—not 5 Hour Energy, specifically, just a low-calorie energy supplement.  But this “recommendation” was still further qualified; they recommended the low-calorie supplement only to their healthy patients who actually use energy supplements.
What do we really learn, then, from this not-so-highly scientific study?
For those statistical anomalies who can somehow be deemed “healthy,” even though they require a regular chemical boost merely to survive the day, 73% of the doctors who didn’t blow this study off as an absurd waste of time recommend that you use an energy supplement that won’t also make you fat, accelerating your already rapid pace to an early grave.
My first inclination was to be offended that 5 Hour Energy thinks there are enough people dull enough to be manipulated by the lady with the perma-smile sitting next to a bunch of fake documents, but then it hit me—they’re not trying to get non-users to take 5 Hour Energy.  They’re trying to help existing users perpetuate their own ruse of self-deception.
Self-deception is more powerful than coercion, because we’re more inclined to believe the stories we tell ourselves (both true and untrue) than the convictions of others.  So the most effective external manipulation is that which supports what we’d already prefer to believe.  I know my body does not naturally require the daily infusion of 5 Hour Energy if I actually get enough sleep and exercise—but I’d rather not, so I’ll buy your story about the 73% of doctors.
What stories are you buying regarding your health, marriage or other relationships, work or finances that are rooted in self-deception?  And what forces may be seeking to perpetuate that self-deception?


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Is Your Energy Drink Turning You Into a Woman?

mfHere’s a short quiz for all the male energy drink addicts out there.
  1. Have you noticed the growth of man boobs since drinking energy drinks?
  2. Has your  shaving strangely cut down to once a month?
  3. Can you sing along with Michael when you hear song “Billy Jean”?
  4. Do you cry for no reason and then the next minute giggle like a school girl?
  5. Have you experienced unexplained shrinkage?
If you answered yes to any of the above questions, your beloved Energy Drinks could be turning you into a woman. Now don’t get me wrong, women are great and all, but most guys don’t want to become one, right?
Well it appears Energy Drinks are testing positive for  the chemical, Bisphenol A, which mimics the hormone estrogen. This chemical is often used to line the inside of cans and new testing performed  in Canada showed alarming levels of this chemical in the drinks themselves.
This chemical is known to cause birth defects, but it is unclear if it really causes damage in adults. However, it’s something to be aware of and guys if you have any of the above symptoms you may want to have your hormone levels checked!
Source: TheDailyGreen.com

Can Energy Drinks Damage Your Kidneys?
Aug 18, 2011 | By Joe King, M.S.
Energy drinks are any beverage that is promoted to increase energy, alertness or athletic performance. While some of the ingredients in most energy drinks may indeed increase your energy levels, these same ingredients can also be harmful to your kidneys, especially if you are consuming them in large quantities. The main energy-producing ingredients in many energy drinks are taurine, caffeine and sugar. Talk to your doctor about energy drinks and these ingredients before drinking them, especially if you suffer from weak or damaged kidneys.


Taurine

Taurine is an amino acid found in high quantities naturally throughout your body and is needed for many different bodily functions. Taurine is often included in energy drinks due to its potential energy-producing effect, even though there is limited scientific evidence to support this rationale, according to a 2002 study published in the "Oxford Journal of Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation." In this study, researchers found that taurine in energy drinks can accelerate kidney damage in patients who suffer from kidney disease.


Caffeine

Caffeine is the most widely used ingredient in the majority of energy drinks because it has been scientifically shown to stimulate energy and increase mental alertness and athletic performance, according to the book, " Essentials of Sports Nutrition and Supplements." Energy drinks can cause a caffeine overdose because some energy drinks may contain as much as three times the amount of caffeine found in soda, according to an article in "The Clinical Advisor." Long-term supplementation with caffeine can cause kidney damage and renal system failure.


Sugar

Sugar, usually in the form of dextrose, is one of the primary ingredients of many energy drinks. A high intake of simple sugars, such as dextrose, can cause wild swings in your blood sugar levels. This not only places stress on your pancreas, which produces the insulin hormone, but it also places stress on your kidneys. Your kidneys are responsible for not only filtering out toxins in your blood stream, but excess water as well. Dextrose promotes water retention, which makes it difficult for your kidneys to function optimally.
Recommendations

Energy drinks should never be consumed by children or adolescents due to the potential risk of a variety of side effects, the American Academy of Pediatrics states. While the Food and Drug Administration has yet to offer any specific guidelines for energy drink consumption, MayoClinic.com states that they can be acceptable, but only when used in moderation. Always talk to your doctor first before using energy drinks to boost energy.
References


    "Essentials of Sports Nutrition and Supplements"; Jose Antonio, Douglass Kalman, Jeffrey R. Stout, and Mike Greenwood; 2008
    "Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation"; Accumulation of Taurine in Patients with Renal Failure; M.E. Suliman et al.; 2002
    "The Clinical Advisor"; Energy Drinks May Cause Caffeine Overdose, Drug Interactions; Nicole Blazek; February 2011
    Medscape Today News; AAP Guidelines Nix Energy Drinks for Children, Teens; Laurie Barclay; May 2011
    Mayo Clinic; Can Energy Drinks Really Boost a Person's Energy?; Katherine Zeratsky


Article reviewed by Jenna Marie Last updated on: Aug 18, 2011


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More Deaths, Illness Linked to Energy Drinks

By WebMD Health News Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD
Nov. 16, 2012 -- The FDA has posted adverse-event reports for two more energy drinks: 40 illnesses and five deaths linked to Monster Energy, and 13 illnesses and two lasting disabilities linked to Rockstar Energy.
The new reports follow this week's revelation of FDA reports linking 92 illnesses and 13 deaths to 5-Hour Energy shots. The FDA previously said it was investigating the deaths linked to 

Monster Energy.
These adverse-event reports (AERs) are filed by patients, families, or doctors. They simply warn that the products might have harmed someone -- but they do not prove that the product caused harm. The FDA can remove a product from the market only when investigation shows that the product causes harm when used according to the product label.
"If we find a relationship between consumption of the product and harm, FDA will take appropriate action to reduce or eliminate the risk,"  FDA public information officer Shelly Burgess says.


Moreover, the reports do not offer details on any underlying medical conditions that may have led to product-related illnesses.
The reports, some dating back to 2004, are not a complete inventory of all events that product users may have suffered. Most people, and many doctors, do not know how to file these reports or do not get around to filing them. And even when a product actually causes an illness, a user or doctor may not associate the product with the illness.
The new reports detail the events suffered by users of 5-Hour, Monster, and Rockstar energy drinks. These include:

  • Deaths due to heart attack or suicide linked to 5-Hour Energy
  • A miscarriage linked to 5-Hour Energy
  • Convulsions, life-threatening fear, deafness, and hemorrhage linked to 5-Hour Energy
  • Deaths due to heart attack or loss of consciousness linked to Monster Energy drink
  • Hospitalization due to irregular heartbeat, severe diarrhea, migraine, psychotic disorder, heart attack, and/or vomiting linked to Monster Energy drink
  • Disability from irregular heartbeat or stroke linked to Rockstar Energy drink
  • Hospitalization due to psychotic disorder, increased heart rate, or loss of consciousness linked to Rockstar Energy drink
  •  
All of these reports are collected by the product manufacturers. Because they market their products as nutritional supplements, they are required to submit them to the FDA.
A recent government report documented a sharp spike in the number of people who need emergency medical care after consuming energy drinks.
Living Essentials, the maker of 5-Hour Energy, said in a statement that the company "takes reports of any potential adverse event tied to our products very seriously."
But the company maintains that its products are safe when used as directed. Rockstar and Monster Energy did not respond to interview requests by publication time.

Caffeine Levels in Energy Drinks

Caffeine is the main active ingredient in energy drinks, most of which also contain herbal supplements.
A recent test by Consumer Reports found that:

  • 5-Hour Energy contains 215 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • 5-Hour Energy Extra Strength contains 242 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • Monster Energy contains 92 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • Rockstar Energy Drink, Double Strength contains 80 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • Rockstar Energy Shot contains 229 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
An 8-ounce cup of coffee has about 100 milligrams of caffeine, although that varies according to how the coffee is brewed. For example, Consumer Reports finds that 8 ounces of Starbucks coffee has 165 milligrams of caffeine.
According to Consumer Reports, safe limits of caffeine are up to 400 milligrams per day for healthy adults, 200 milligrams a day for pregnant women, and up to 45 or 85 milligrams per day for children, depending on weight.
High doses of caffeine can result in restlessness, nervousness, insomnia, and tremors. High doses can also trigger seizures and unstable heart rhythm.
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5 Hour Energy Drink Side Effects

Mar 8, 2011 | By Maggie Lynn









Energy drinks can be a great way to get that extra boost to push you through the busy work day. 5 Hour Energy has quickly become one of the most popular energy drinks for its ability to provide a caffeine equivalent boost without the crash later. While this may be true, 5 Hour Energy can warrant side effects beyond simply improving energy. It contains a blend of many different chemicals at high doses. The long-term effects of this combination of chemicals are still unknown. However, the short-term side effects can be seen almost instantly, and should be realized before ingesting large amounts of this product.

Niacin Flush

Niacin Flush is a condition experienced by people naturally sensitive to the high amounts of B3 (also known as Niacin) that can be found in 5 Hour Energy. These people, when exposed to this level of B3, experience a hot prickly sensation on their body, as well as reddening of the skin. This reaction occurs as a result of the B3 increasing the flow of blood below the surface of the skin.

Loss of Muscle Coordination

The loss of your body's muscle coordination can stem from ingesting too much vitamin B6. The approximate level of B6 needed to reach nerve toxicity is over 200 mg. This is equivalent to around five bottles of the 5 Hour Energy product. The effects of this loss of coordination can make the person become clumsy and incapable of performing simple tasks. In the worst cases, it can even cause temporary paralysis.

Brain Damage to Phenylketonurics

People who have been diagnosed with phenylketonuria should not drink 5 Hour Energy. It contains an artificial sweetener incorporating the chemical phenlalanine. While this may be an essential amino acid to those without the genetic disorder, phenylketonurics can experience severe brain damage. Doing so could result in mental retardation due to the corrosive effect of the chemical on phenylketonurics' brain cells.

References



Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/84653-hour-energy-drink-side-effects/#ixzz2CZ9vObbV 5-Hour Energy Drinks Cited in 13 Deaths

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